Blog Header
The Insights Blog

Dedicated To Helping Readers
Be More Interesting
Since 2004.

As Featured In:

Guest Post: What's In a Name?

By Nedra Weinreich

I’m honored to have been invited to join the illustrious cast of bloggers here filling in. Congratulations to Rohit and his family on the birth of Jaiden Kumar! What a beautiful name.

I’ve been thinking about names a lot lately. Many would say that names are destiny. What you are called shapes your self-perception and how others respond to you. How do you picture a woman named Brandi? What does she look like? What is her personality? What kind of job might she have? Now picture someone named Susan. Do different images come to mind? What you call yourself and what others call you is important.

Now, what if everyone had variations of the same name? This is quite common in China, where there are more than a billion people sharing about 100 surnames, and 1.3 million people are named Liu Bo. It happens here in the US too, where we have plenty of John Smiths and Lisa Williams. In fact, my sister’s best friend in elementary school had a name pronounced exactly the same as hers (though different by a couple of letters). It gets confusing pretty quickly, especially when you are searching online for someone with a very common name.

This naming issue has come to the fore over the past couple of years in my field of specialization, social marketing. No, I’m not talking about using Facebook and blogs and word of mouth. I’m referring to the over quarter-century old marketing specialty geared toward motivating health and social change. If you do a Google search on "social marketing," you’ll see that most (but not all) of the results are websites providing information on this established field.

However, do the same search on Technorati, and you’ll find that nearly all of the results are from bloggers using the term "social marketing" to refer to anything from using social media like blogs or YouTube, to using social networking websites like Facebook and MySpace, to anything vaguely Web 2.0-ish.

Yikes — this gets awfully confusing for anyone who wants to learn, talk about, or search for information on either type of social marketing. A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but an American Beauty rose and Rose Kennedy would smell quite a bit different from each other. The same shift is happening right now with the term "social advertising," which had a very specific meaning of advertising about social issues, but suddenly found itself with a new role as a result of Facebook’s Social Ads (which spurred its own Facebook protest group).

Why is this issue important?

First, and most practically, people searching online for information about either type of social marketing are bound to encounter the wrong sites for their needs. Only those who already have some idea of what they are looking for will be able to effectively pick through the results.

Second, clarity saves a lot of misunderstandings and wasted time. When I’m talking to tech-savvy people for the first time, I generally have to spend the first part of the conversation explaining what kind of social marketing I do. And whenever someone else refers to "social marketing," I have to make sure that we both mean the same thing by the term.

Third, we health and social change social marketers have had a hard time building a brand identity for social marketing — it’s still widely unknown or misunderstood even among nonprofit and government agency people who have never heard of social media or Web 2.0. Mixing in the name confusion definitely doesn’t help!

So, what can we do about it at this point? It could be that the new meaning has spread so well via "social marketing" that the genie is out of the bottle now and there’s no going back. This would mean either living with the ambiguity or rebranding the old social marketing under another name — I’m thinking "social change marketing" might do a good job of retaining the essence while clarifying the distinction (too New Coke?). Or we could work to stamp out all incorrect uses of the term while arguing for more semantic exactitude.  I’ve tried being the social marketing police for a while, but that loses its appeal when you feel vastly outnumbered. Looks like I’m going to have to use my marketing prowess to bring about change on this. Okay, then…

Be a better marketer when you buy classic Social Marketing! Avoid those looks of disapproval from your fellow marketers by using the term correctly. Everybody’s doing it! Tell all your friends!

But I’d love to hear your ideas too.

Nkwcloseup Nedra Weinreich is a social marketing consultant and blogger at Spare Change.

7 thoughts on “Guest Post: What's In a Name?”

  1. Nedra, good to see you on this blog (Rohit would be proud). Anyways, I view social media as a channel. Marketing tactics can be used to push information down this channel and hopefully create a transaction at the other end.

    Reply
  2. Well Nedra, stumbled in here with a google search on that very term social marketing! Now whatever the meaning, and I mean this most sincerely, community on the internet can have a very dramatic effect on that age old meaning you refer to.

    Genuine people are grouping together and affecting real change, slowly yes, but with this new social media/social networking thing, word does spread and it becomes a tidal wave.

    Anyway enjoyed your post.

    Reply
  3. It’s an interesting quandary and as a next generation Marketing Agency, Topia has straddled this fence completely simply through the need to not confuse clients around both forms of marketing.

    Quite simply, we refer to the new wave of Social Marketing as you’ve referred to here, as Social Media Optimisation, which is part of Social Media. I disagree with Dan’s comment that it’s just a channel – it’s so much more than that! It is not possible to run a truly successful Social Media campaign without fundamental creative components. It requires a completely integrated media, PR and creative (and sometimes branded content) teams to devise a standout campaign that generates the blue sky numbers clients are looking for in a channel strategy that is only just proving itself.

    So therein lies the solution to the name quandary! Social Marketing stays (from my perspective it’s like shotgun to get the front seat of the car and Social Marketers called shotgun a very, very long time ago) and the new wave of marketing oppotunities around social networks is called Social Media and Social Media Optimisation.

    Hope this helps! Check out the latest issue of Digital Media Magazine (comes with B&T once p/quarter); there is an article in there called “HOW TO SMO” – very valuable stuff!

    https://www.bandt.com.au/

    Reply
  4. It’s an interesting quandary and as a next generation Marketing Agency, Topia has straddled this fence completely simply through the need to not confuse clients around both forms of marketing.

    Quite simply, we refer to the new wave of Social Marketing as you’ve referred to here, as Social Media Optimisation, which is part of Social Media. I disagree with Dan’s comment that it’s just a channel – it’s so much more than that! It is not possible to run a truly successful Social Media campaign without fundamental creative components. It requires a completely integrated media, PR and creative (and sometimes branded content) teams to devise a standout campaign that generates the blue sky numbers clients are looking for in a channel strategy that is only just proving itself.

    So therein lies the solution to the name quandary! Social Marketing stays (from my perspective it’s like shotgun to get the front seat of the car and Social Marketers called shotgun a very, very long time ago) and the new wave of marketing oppotunities around social networks is called Social Media and Social Media Optimisation.

    Hope this helps! Check out the latest issue of Digital Media Magazine (comes with B&T once p/quarter); there is an article in there called “HOW TO SMO” – very valuable stuff!

    https://www.bandt.com.au/

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Vector Smart Object

About Rohit

A keynote speaker on trends, innovation, marketing, storytelling and diversity.

Rohit Bhargava is on a mission to inspire more non-obvious thinking in the world. He is the #1 Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestselling author of eight books and is widely considered one of the most entertaining and original speakers on disruption, trends and marketing in the world.

Rohit has been invited to keynote events in 32 countries … and over the past year, given more than 100 virtual talks from his home studio. He previously spent 15 years as a marketing strategist at Ogilvy and Leo Burnett and also teaches marketing and storytelling as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University.

He loves the Olympics, actively hates cauliflower and is a proud dad of boys.

Rohit Bhargava About (1)

Speaking

Do you need a speaker that can help your audience be more innovative and anticipate the future?

For more than a decade, Rohit Bhargava has been inspiring audiences at NASA, Disney, Schwab, Microsoft, SXSW, Coca-Cola and hundreds of other clients with his signature non-obvious keynote presentations. He is a master at weaving recent stories into his talks in a way that helps audiences better understand the world today, while also preparing to lead the future.

Non Obvious Insights
Layer 97
Non Obvious Insights Newsletter
Layer 118

Skip the obvious and anticipate the future with our weekly newsletter. Join over 25,000 subscribers and start receiving the stories (and insights) you’ve been missing.

Books

#1 WSJ & USAToday Bestselling Author

Rohit is the author of 8 books on trends, the future of business, building a more human brand with storytelling and how to create a more diverse and inclusive world.

Vector Smart Object

Contact

Have a Question or Inquiry?

Just fill out this form, and we’ll get back to you within 24 hours!

About You

What Are You Contacting Us About*:

Your Message